How to determine verb conjugation?

Alexandra Bychkova
Alexandra Bychkova
August 16, 2012
34464
How to determine verb conjugation?

In modern school, the definition of verb conjugation is one of the most intricate topics when studying the morphology of modern Russian. Sometimes even the best students, who write very well, cannot determine from the first time which conjugation the verb “have” or “want” refers to. In addition, the correct definition of verb conjugation allows you to write personal endings of verbs without errors. In addition, as is known, each rule has its own exceptions, and the more there are, the faster you can get confused. How to determine verb conjugation?

Russian verb has two conjugations, which are conventionally called the "first" and "second." The easiest way to determine the verb conjugation is to distinguish between verb forms at the end. Simply put, if the verb in the third person plural has the ending:

  • -out (-out) is the verb of the first conjugation;
  • -at (-s) is the verb of the second conjugation.

But if all the rules in Russian were so simple! Fortunately, there are a number of ways to help pinpoint the verb conjugation:

  1. If stress changes at the end of a verb, then in order to determine the conjugation of a verb, you need to use the same rule described by us above. That is, the verbs of the first conjugation will have at the end -out (-yout) ("name," "sing," "pour," "cherish," "bloom"), and the verbs of the second conjugation -at (-yat) ("sleep "," hang "," burn "," sit "," lie ").
  2. If stress changes at the end of a verb, then in order to determine the conjugation of a verb, you need to find the infinitive form of this verb: that is, if the verb will end in impersonal form with —it, then the second verb verb (for example, “walk”) "," wet "," catch "," salt "). Exceptions include the words shave, lay, huddle, and build (these are the verbs of the first conjugation).
  3. If the verb does not fall on stress, but in the infinitive form, the verb ends in –– and – – ––, then the verb of the first conjugation is in front of us. The exceptions in this rule include the following verbs: watch, see, depend, endure, hate, twirl, offend, hear, breathe, hold, drive (these are verbs of the second conjugation).

In Russian, there are also sparse verbs, the change of the forms of which occurs by two conjugations simultaneously. These include the verbs "to want", "to run", "to dare", "to honor".